TarraWarra Biennial 2021: Slow Moving Waters

TarraWarra Museum of Art is situated on Wurundjeri Country; on the lands and waters of the traditional owners, the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin Nation. In Woiwurrung language, the word ‘Tarrawarra’ accepts the translation ‘slow moving waters’.

Drawing inspiration from these connections, ‘TarraWarra Biennial’ in 2021 presents an exhibition of artworks and site-specific installations by 25 artists from across Australia, which respond to themes of duration, suspension, withdrawal, stillness and the elasticity of time, from 27 March to 11 July. Not time as we experience it in the accelerated rhythms of everyday modern life, nor the hum of instantaneous communications and 24-hour news cycles, but expressions of time that ruminate deep within the geological and cosmic currents of the universe – calling to the natural cycles and rhythms of the earth – seeking to restore a deep-rooted connection to land and Country – to ancient knowledge and long-forgotten lore.

Lucy Bleach, something more solid, 2017, toffee, full-size cello, electro magnet, contact mic, amplifier, cingel film, dimensions variable. Photograph: Peter Mathew. Courtesy the artist and TarraWarra Museum of Art, Melbourne

Guest Curator Nina Miall says the exhibition ‘takes shape around two related cues: the idea of slowness, and the winding course of the Birrarung (Yarra River), which flows south of the Museum grounds. In tune with the unhurried arc of the river, ‘Slow Moving Waters’ proposes a stay to the ever more rapid flows of people, commerce and information that characterise the dynamic of globalisation.’

Artists: Robert Andrew, Jeremy Bakker, Lucy Bleach, Lauren Brincat, Louisa Bufardeci, Sundari Carmody, Christian Capurro, Jacobus Capone, Daniel Crooks, Megan Cope, George Egerton-Warburton, Nicole Foreshew and P. Thomas Boorljoonngali, Caitlin Franzmann, James Geurts, Michaela Gleave, Jonathan Jones with Aunty Joy Murphy Wandin AO, Noŋgirrŋa Marawili, Brian Martin, Raquel Ormella, Mandy Quadrio, Yasmin Smith, Grant Stevens and Oliver Wagner.

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